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20120730
20120730
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
the vatican versus u.s. nuns. this really is about the future of how we interpret the message of the second vatican council. >>> and islamic art, in present and former arab lands. >>> major funding for "religion & ethics newsweekly" is provided by the lilly endowment, an indianapolis based private family foundation, dedicated to its founders and christian religion, community development and education. additional funding provided by mutual of america, designing customized, individual and group retirement product. that's why we're your retirement company. the estate of william j. carter. the jane henson foundation and corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome, i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. thousands of political leaders, doctors and activists gathered in washington this week for the biannual international aids conference, held for the first time in the u.s. in more than 20 years. at a georgetown university summit timed to the conference, religious groups highlighted the role of faith-based efforts in combating the disease internationally. mega church pastor rick war
us about that, alicia. >> reporter: yeah. judge william sylvester will also address the motions by the defense as well as by the media. 20 media organizations including fox news are requesting that records relating to the case be unsealed arguing that the public has a legitimate interest in knowing what actions were taken by multiple officials in the case including information relating to dr. lynn fenton. she is a psychiatrist at the university of colorado medical center, who according to court documents was treating holmes and to whom he sent a package. fox and other news outlets said that package contained a notebook which holmes reportedly dei would at that the killings. the defense has filed a motion that package be turned over immediately. bill: a lot to go through. alicia acuna thank you. the deeper it gets. more coming up on the story. holmes would potentially face hundreds of charges today. plus what about his behavior in and outside of the courtroom? is it an act? our panel will debate that. heather. heather: three of the victims were laid to recent over the weekend in
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
the prosecutors haven't decided which law they will use at trial. some victims and some relative-- relatives were in the courtroom in centennial colorado and so was john blackstone. john, what did you see? >> scott, well, james holmes still has orange hair and he looked as if he hasn't shaved since he was arrested. but in court today he showed no emotion. and he stared up at the ceiling. he often opened his eyes very wide for no apparent reason. but he never made eye contact with the victims or their families who were in the courtroom. >> reporter: this was holmes in court last week, the last time we saw him on camera. this time the judge barred cameras from the courtroom. some of those still healing from wounds suffered in the theatre shooting came to the court to see him formally charged. ali garbi whose 16-year-old son suffered a head wound came in search of an answer. >> i want to ask him why he did it. i mean you know, why he did it. >> reporter: but holmes said just one word today. the judge asked if he agreed to waive his right to a preliminary hearing in 35 days. holmes replied "yes" >> h
israel's bombing of iran? >> we should use every political vehicle available to us to keep iran from becoming a nuclear capability state but that's as far as i'm willing to go in terms of discussing this matter while on foreign soil. >> reporter: israel the second stop on romney the three-nation tour. sunday help visited the holy wall, the holiest site in judaism and met with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. a friend of romney's more than 30 years. >> welcome to jerusalem. >> reporter: today romney is looking to raise $1 million in a fund-raiser in jerusalem. one attendee who flew in from the united states, a billionaire casino magnate who pledged to spend up to $100 million of his own money to help defeat president obama. just last month he made a $10 million donation to the pro-romney superpac, restore our future. a rare chance to interact with mr. adelson at romney's speech but didn't discuss much. >> many response on the speech? >> loved it. >> reporter: the reaction romney got from quite a few. one donor described it as a lovefest. today romney heads off to poland meeting with
of iran? >> we should use every diplomatic and political vehicle that's available to us to keep iran from becoming a nuclear capability state, but that's as far as i'm willing to go in terms of discussing that matter while on foreign soil. >> reporter: israel was the second stop on romney's three mags foreign tour. earlier sunday he visited the western wall, the holiest site in judaism, and met with president shimon peres and benjamin netanyahu, a friend of romney's for more than 30 years. >> welcome to jerusalem. >> reporter: today romney is looking to raise $1 million in a fund-raiser in jerusalem. one attendee is sheldon adelson, a billionaire casino magnet who has pledged to spend up to $100 million of his own money to help defeat president obama. just last month he made a $10 million donation to the pro-romney super pac restore our future. reporters got a rare chance to interact with mr. adelson at mr. romney's speech but he didn't reveal much. >> any thoughts on the speech? >> loved it. >> reporter: that was the reaction romney got from quite a few people here. one donor i talked to
northern syria and brings us the latest. >> reporter: fighting continued to rage in aleppo, syria's commercial can't. shelling neighborhoods taken by opposition forces desperately clinging on calling for heavier weapons. we crossed into syria early this morning, our first stop was a city which had seen heavy violence last month outside aleppo. there hardly seemed to be a single building left untouched. and virtually a ghost town. also remarkable was traveling all day across northern syria, we didn't see a single government tank or troop. which tells you how far these opposition forces have come. but until they take a city like aleppo they have a long way to go. >>> reporting there from inside syria. two big developments in syria. one, the chemical weapons, removed, transported, eyes of the world wondering if assad will use them, when, how? and the use of helicopters. the first in the last couple weeks. bombing his own people here. and defense secretary, panetta said using helicopters against his own people was a nail in his coffin. talk getting very, very tough. wondering if assad
get his insides. we are glad you could join us for our conversation with buzz bissinger, coming up. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: buzz bissinger is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist and best-selling night lights" and "a prayer for the city." he is also a contributing editor for "vanity fair" and a sports columnist with the daily beast. his latest text is called "father's day: a journey into the mind and heart of my extraordinary son." buzz, good to have you on this program. >> hey, thank you, thank you. tavis: i suspect most parents think their sons, or daughters, for that matter, are extraordinary. that is a heck of a title. "my extraordinary son." is that a little fatherly pride, or what's the reason for calling your son extraordinary? >> well, i do not -- we all have fatherly pride, and i think that is a good thi
frustrated easily. i can be volatile. so instead of drawing us closer, which i think it has now, it did create a gap. i was very frustrated. i couldn't really talk to him. as i said, i felt very, very stuck with him. at one point, when he got into high school, i said to his mom, "you have to take him," because a, it is a better situation for him, and frankly, i do not know what to do anymore. i cannot stand it that he's on the couch watching a tv show that he doesn't care about. i feel helpless, i feel frustrated, and i think there are a lot of parents with these kids who do feel -- you feel frustration, pain, rage, and are reluctant to express it because then other parents say, "well, that means you really didn't love your kid and you didn't want your kid." that was never, ever the case, but i am not going to lie -- there was a gap. i remember people would say, well, my kid's going to harvard, my kid's going to penn, my kid's going to yale, and i bought into that. there i am with a son who's going to bag groceries for the rest of his life. tavis: you've said a few times in this convers
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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